Prinsengracht 116; 1015 EA
Amsterdam – Netherlands
+31 (0)20 421 00 95
info@tulipmuseum.org
Open Daily from 10-6
Closed April 27th and December 25th

Admission Cost

€5.00
€10.00
€3.00 each
FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
How long does a visit last?

An average stay is 20-25 minutes for visitors who are looking to get an overall idea of the tulip’s history. For those who really want to dive deeper into the subject and watch all the films, it takes about an hour.

The museum offers a comprehensive look at Holland’s favorite flower. Visitors can immerse themselves in the world of tulips through photographs, videos, interactive displays and historical artifacts.

There are six main rooms that highlight the following subjects:

  • An introduction to the tulip
  • The original tulip and its native surroundings
  • The tulip during the Ottoman Empire and its voyage to the Netherlands
  • The tulip trade during Holland’s 16th and 17th century, including the tulip mania and crash
  • The growing of tulips, in the past and now
Is the museum fun for children?

Children enjoy the museum because there is so much to see and do. The six connected rooms each differ in size and style—one is bright, while the next is much darker.

We hope to stimulate a child’s imagination, including colorful pictures, a fairy tale-like depiction of the voyage of the tulip from Turkey to Holland and interactive displays. Various short and longer movies share additional information—sometimes of a practical nature and sometimes funny, but always interesting. 

Is it easily accessible?

The museum is located in a historical, canal-side house. As a result, the museum is unfortunately not equipped to handle wheelchairs at this time.

Can I buy tickets ahead of time?

Currently, tickets can only be purchased at the time of your visit. Cash or credit card is acceptable.

Are there discounts?

The standard entrance fee to the museum is €5.00. Families of three or more pay €10.00. Students pay a discounted rate of €3.00 each.

Why are there crosses on the logo?

The three crosses in the logo of the Amsterdam Tulip Museum represent the three crosses in the coat of arms of Amsterdam. The coat of arms is thought to have been introduced in 1280. The first discovery of it was in documents dating back to 1419.

While what the three crosses mean is still a mystery, they are so-called Andreas crosses. Andreas was an apostle who died a martyr’s death on the cross. There are various theories about the fundamental meaning of the crosses. According to one version, they refer to the three plagues that Amsterdam suffered through in previous centuries: water, fire, and pestilence.

Even so, it is rather illogical to use such negative particulars in a coat of arms. It is more likely that they represent the three fordable places in the river Amstel; places essential for the origin and development of the town. Throughout the ages, the coat of arms changed many times, however the three crosses have remained.

Can I use my Dutch Museum Card?

The Dutch Museum Card was initiated mostly by large museums—and a few smaller ones—to attract more visitors. The Amsterdam Tulip Museum does not participate in the program at this time.

Can I use the I Amsterdam City Card?

Yes!

Are visits by groups allowed?

Space in the museum is limited. To see everything leisurely and at ease, the number of visitors is restricted to 25 people at one time.

How long does a visit last?
Is the museum fun for children?
Is it easily accessible?
Can I buy tickets ahead of time?
Are there discounts?
Why are there crosses on the logo?
Can I use my Dutch Museum Card?
Can I use the I Amsterdam City Card?
Are visits by groups allowed?

An average stay is 20-25 minutes for visitors who are looking to get an overall idea of the tulip’s history. For those who really want to dive deeper into the subject and watch all the films, it takes about an hour.

The museum offers a comprehensive look at Holland’s favorite flower. Visitors can immerse themselves in the world of tulips through photographs, videos, interactive displays and historical artifacts.

There are six main rooms that highlight the following subjects:

  • An introduction to the tulip
  • The original tulip and its native surroundings
  • The tulip during the Ottoman Empire and its voyage to the Netherlands
  • The tulip trade during Holland’s 16th and 17th century, including the tulip mania and crash
  • The growing of tulips, in the past and now

Children enjoy the museum because there is so much to see and do. The six connected rooms each differ in size and style—one is bright, while the next is much darker.

We hope to stimulate a child’s imagination, including colorful pictures, a fairy tale-like depiction of the voyage of the tulip from Turkey to Holland and interactive displays. Various short and longer movies share additional information—sometimes of a practical nature and sometimes funny, but always interesting. 

The museum is located in a historical, canal-side house. As a result, the museum is unfortunately not equipped to handle wheelchairs at this time.

Currently, tickets can only be purchased at the time of your visit. Cash or credit card is acceptable.

The standard entrance fee to the museum is €5.00. Families of three or more pay €10.00. Students pay a discounted rate of €3.00 each.

The three crosses in the logo of the Amsterdam Tulip Museum represent the three crosses in the coat of arms of Amsterdam. The coat of arms is thought to have been introduced in 1280. The first discovery of it was in documents dating back to 1419.

While what the three crosses mean is still a mystery, they are so-called Andreas crosses. Andreas was an apostle who died a martyr’s death on the cross. There are various theories about the fundamental meaning of the crosses. According to one version, they refer to the three plagues that Amsterdam suffered through in previous centuries: water, fire, and pestilence.

Even so, it is rather illogical to use such negative particulars in a coat of arms. It is more likely that they represent the three fordable places in the river Amstel; places essential for the origin and development of the town. Throughout the ages, the coat of arms changed many times, however the three crosses have remained.

The Dutch Museum Card was initiated mostly by large museums—and a few smaller ones—to attract more visitors. The Amsterdam Tulip Museum does not participate in the program at this time.

Yes!

Space in the museum is limited. To see everything leisurely and at ease, the number of visitors is restricted to 25 people at one time.

ABOUT AMSTERDAM TULIP MUSUEM

The Amsterdam Tulip Museum walks visitors through the special and suspenseful history of the tulip—from its initial discovery to the ways in which it is represented in today’s mediums. With a collection of curated photographs, videos, and beautifully designed scenes, visitors are transported to various centuries throughout the tulip’s beloved world journey. 

“I think people should come to this museum because it’s such a small little quirky find. It’s very enjoyable. It has something for everyone: people who like picturesque things, people who like history, and people who just want something to do in Amsterdam.” ~ Renica, London

“It gives you the whole history of how tulips got to Holland, and now to the biggest exporter in the world, it’s actually brilliant to know all about it. The tulip garden season is open from March to May, only about 50 days in Holland. If you want to experience tulips after that season, I think this museum is a great way to do it.” ~ Priyanka, New Delhi

“I like the layout, it’s nice and colorful.” ~ Emily, Ipswich

“People should come to the museum because they will find a lot more variations of tulips. I found some flowers that are very nice, that I wouldn’t have figured were tulips.” ~ Gabriel, Cyprus

 

PRESS CONTACT

In Europe
All About Tulips
+31 (0)6 29077755
In North America
Sally Ferguson
+1 802-325-3200